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18 Extraordinary Examples of Deep Green Websites

Extraordinary Examples of Deep Green Websites

For the last couple of years, humanity has found itself in dire need of hope and optimism. With everything going on in the world, people are growing tired and weary of the hyper-industrialized, tech-driven and generally destructive path we’re treading, and are turning more and more to nature, to its comforting opulence and invigorating freshness. Nature, of course, cannot possibly be reduced to a single color – certainly, there are more shades and hues in it than there are hex codes, and you know that’s a lot. Still, if you’d have to pick one color to associate with nature, that would have to be green, wouldn’t it?

Green, especially its darker, deeper variants, has been recognized as one of the definitive inspirations not just this year, but it’s also predicted to mark the design trends in industries from tech and web to fashion and interior design in years to come. In fact, Shutterstock included a particular shade of dark green – Tidewater Green – into its annual report on color trends for 2021, based on the statistics on the most downloaded images and their colors.

Dark green is reminiscent of lush tropical foliage, rainforests and pine groves. It communicates the freshness, fragrance and lifegiving moisture of these natural ambients. When used in web design, it can bring vitality to chromatically minimalist layouts or, conversely, help tone down busier layouts. It pairs wonderfully with neutral, light backgrounds, as well as with palettes based on warm yellows, ochres and corals. Dark green is also a color that represents class, sophistication and wealth. In addition, it can be associated with education and intellectualism – just think of library walls lined with dark green leather, green reading lamps, felt highchairs and monogrammed binders in old university salons. As such, it can be a great choice for designs that aim to exude serious professionalism.

In short – dark green is a multifaceted color that can take on a number of roles and can serve as a rich design element, and these are the websites that prove that point particularly well:

The Scott

The Scott

The Scott Resort and Spa is a line of luxury hotels in Scottsdale and Phoenix, Arizona, and Laguna Beach and Carmel, California. Refined and beautifully designed, the hotels promise a relaxing and reviving stay in an ambience that is, according to the website, “an ode to the life lived on the borderlands.” In line with that motif, The Scott bases its aesthetics on natural materials, lush greenery and plenty of sun. The website opens with a beautiful section in a rich tropical green. Dark green, but this time in a smokier shade with a tint of blue, is repeated in the typography and various navigational elements, and then we encounter another lush section in dark green with monstera leaves and white typography. These sections are combined with areas in a very light green, setting the overall mood of these clean and elegant layouts to one that spells freshness and light.

The Body Shop Body Butters

The Body Shop Body Butters

A rich, dark green is the signature color of The Body Shop, and this color is prominently featured in the cosmetic brand’s new campaign for their line of body butters. After a beautiful intro section with a deep green background and light pink details, we are invited on an interactive journey in five chapters, the first one introducing the campaign slogan Go Love Yourself and the others introducing the history of the product, the ingredients, sustainability and new body butter fragrances. The dark green is featured here in selected typography and details containing the brand logo (which can be seen both in white and in dark green throughout the website). There’s an interactive green section at the top that can be pulled and released, after which it fills with dozens and dozens of body butters in various fragrances. The cursor is a dot that is generally pink but when placed over certain elements, it turns into the same dark green we see everywhere. The rest of the chapters feature similar delightful details and are remarkably well designed. The green and pink combination is the brand’s signature one, but this campaign definitely takes it to a whole new level.

RipePlanet

RipePlanet

RipePlanet is a collective of agricultural businesses united around one priority – sustainable production. Driven by the slogan The World is Ripe for Change, the collective strives to observe the best agricultural practices and introduce systems that will not only avoid further damaging the environment, but also help reduce the damage already made.

The website opens with a section in a beautiful dark green with a blue tint, a shade that symbolizes fertility, the opulence of the natural world, growth and prosperity. The background here has contour curves, representing softly rolling land. The green color is paired with a tender pink used for the menu opener, cookie opt-in form and other interface details. As we scroll further down, the background turns white, and then returns to the same pink tone, again with the contour lines. These two corresponding sections stand for all the gifts of the land – the leaves, the grass, the flowers – that the collective is so eager to preserve and protect.

Wilder Fields

Wilder Fields

Vertical indoor agriculture has been gaining huge momentum these last few years, and Wilder Fields is one of the shining examples of how this agricultural principle can be used to improve not just the sustainability but also the local community. This technology-enabled food company is reusing an old Target facility just outside Chicago to produce safe, eco-friendly, highly nutritious greens and microgreens, such as kale, spinach, lettuce and much more.

The Wilder Fields website opens with a logo in a curvy, romantic, a bit old-timey typeface over a hi-res image of a delicious tossed salad, with a cursor that is a bright red dot. As we scroll down, a green transparent overlay introduces the theme color, which is a beautiful deep green in a decisively warm tone, coming from its deep yellow component. In addition to sections in green, the website also uses an eggshell white for the background, combined with dark green typography, as well as blue, brown and coral red. Despite these sections in different colors, green remains the theme color, used for various interface elements, buttons, navigation elements and text.

Altermind

Altermind

Deep green is a color that conveys professionalism, respectability and opulence. It is also one of the favorite colors of the academic tradition. It makes sense then that Altermind, a boutique business consultancy that pairs business expertise with academia, chose this particular shade for their website. The website opens with a logo preloader representing a tree with symmetrical branches and roots, standing for growth. The homepage features a fullscreen slider with a dark green background containing architectural patterns. A simple menu opener reveals a fullscreen menu with a plain dark green background and elegant white typography. There is no imagery whatsoever and the overall design is extremely toned down and very sophisticated thanks, to a great extent, to this particular choice of color.

The Year of Greta

The Year of Greta

Greta Thurnberg took the world by the storm in 2018 when she started her environmental campaigns first in her home country of Sweden, and then on a widest (and highest) possible international scale. From her local community to the United Nations, Greta proved to be an absolute tour de force despite her very tender age and in 2019 she was named the Time Magazine’s Person of the Year, as the youngest person ever to bear this prestigious title. And 2019 was definitely her year, which moved the Dutch creative studio Superhero Cheesecake to create a website to illustrate Greta’s rise from a local campaigner to the most important environmental activist in the world – The Year of Greta. The project is a touching, solemn ode to the girl set out to save the world, featuring a 3D rendition of the iconic photo of Greta standing on a rock, fists clenched, eyes turned fiercely to the sky. The background is green, which is an appropriate, perhaps somewhat obvious choice, but one that pairs well with the spectre-like figure of the girl. It’s a lovely, warm shade of dark green, combined with white for the links, buttons and text. The website is interactive – the timeline can be explored by dragging the mouse and scrolling, revealing photos from various stages of Greta’s 2019, accompanied by descriptive text. It is a lovely passion project and a great digest for those looking to learn more about Greta Thurnberg’s activism.

Next Level Fairs by Geex Arts

Next Level Fairs by Geex Arts

Geex Arts is an award-winning web design and development studio from Russia providing consultancy and concept-to-market services for companies across all industries. In 2019, the studio created a design presentation for Next Level Fairs, a Miami-based fine arts fair company with over 150 fairs held around the world. The website is truly a masterful piece of design, and one for which the studio won several accolades. It opens with a simple screen in burgundy with a warm yellow button that turns into dark green and prompts the visitor to hold it to start the viewing experience. As the button expands, the background now becomes green, a lovely, elegant shade that, together with the burgundy shade from the beginning, sets a classical, sophisticated mood. The green is paired with a soft, toned down yellow used for most of the typography and navigation elements. As we scroll down, we get to explore a gallery of page excerpts, panels and images, laid on top of each other as if they were physical items someone is going through, each one a small design masterpiece. The page is quite long and provides a unique aesthetic experience not only for fine art lovers but also for those who appreciate skillful, elaborate and innovative web design.

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Pure Sunfarms

Pure Sunfarms

Pure Sunfarms is a Canadian brand of cannabis products – both THC and CBD-based, made with great care in British Columbia, following old growing practices. The brand is committed to exploring and developing the classic BC bud, a cannabis strain that has been cultivated in the region for decades.

For first-time visitors, the website opens with a deep green split screen, with a location picker to the left, and an age verification menu on the right. The website aesthetics and color scheme are introduced already on this screen, with light, elegant typography and light pink button selection. Once we complete this step, we enter the website proper. The background color changes from dark green to light, warm gray with touches of orange and pink. The first thing that strikes us is the gorgeous slider with floating buds, each with animated flowers, fruit and sprigs sprouting from it, indicating the type of flavor and aroma you can expect from that bud. The interface details – text, logo and navigation arrows – are dark green, and the same color can be found in the beautiful naive art illustrations throughout the website and even on some of the brand merch, such as t-shirts. It’s a fitting choice of color for a brand that works with cannabis, evoking the prettiest green shades on a juicy young bud.

Recycl8

Recycl8

Recycl8 is a company whose mission is to provide waste management and construction industries with more sustainable solutions and to help them make a real move towards the circular economy. Green makes an appropriate choice of a theme color for a company working in the field of environment protection, and Recycl8 decided to make their shade of green a deep one, pleasant to the eye, adding a feel of professionalism. This color is combined with white for typography and with another, lighter, slightly bluer shade of green, providing a welcome contrast and a touch of freshness to the pages. Some of the sections have a light, off-white background, but the green persists here too, in typography, button outlines and discrete geometric illustrations peppered here and there across the page.

Lucky Folks

Lucky Folks

Lucky Folks is not just an ordinary pub or a restaurant – it’s both, and it’s also a place where guests can enjoy more than the typical selection of pub games. There’s darts, there’s shuffleboard, pétanque and even a separate karaoke room. Although designed primarily for team buildings and corporate events, this venue in Lieusaint, France is open for anyone looking for a fun night out with drinks, great home-cooked food and games.

The website features elements with a particular retro aesthetic, reminiscent of American game parlors, especially in the typography and animated icons representing dice, horseshoes, chess figures and similar imagery. It opens with an intro screen with some text on a deep green background that resembles the felt for pool tables, combined with a warm orange for the typography. The following sections come in different colors, but the green comes back for the hidden menu in the right-hand side of the page and the same green intro can be seen on all pages in the menu. The entire website has a grainy effect that gives the pages a particular texture and adds to the vintage character of the design.

Grove Lust

Grove Lust

Grove Lust is a creative digital studio based in Antwerp, Belgium. Their website is relatively clean, with geometric elements, most notably the layout lines and a circle that follows the cursor. In fact, the site could be deemed minimalist if it weren’t for an animated overlay element that follows the lines and partially covers the large central typography. In addition to this element, what immediately woos the visitor is the stunningly simple color palette, consisting of just two colors – a deep teal for the background and a light bubblegum pink for everything else. This is a tried and proven color combination, but Grove Lust opted for particular shades that are not overused and definitely feel fresh. The clean style of the website is countered by the noisy texture of the animation, resembling grains of sand that dissipate to reveal the background. It is a masterful balance which, together with the choice of the palette, testifies to the studio’s style and skill.

We Compost

We Compost

We Compost is a leading service for compostable waste collection in Auckland, New Zealand. Working with commercial and industrial waste producers, the company uses composting to improve the quality of the soil and reduce the release of methane. Since their foundation in 2012, they have saved an impressive eight million kilos of compostable waste from going to landfills. We Compost works by collecting and processing the commercial compostable waste and then distributing it to partner farms that grow organic produce.

Their website is all about the green – upon entering, we are greeted by a joyful, vibrant shade of eucalyptus green, and a delightful company logo shaped like an earthworm – a creature that is incredibly important in composting processes. The typography is in a very, very dark green shade and subtitles are in a lighter one. Green is featured on the photographs as well, and it’s role as the brand color is reinforced on the company merch – trash can liners and bags for coffee grounds. The homepage ends with a footer in two additional shades of green – one a slightly dimmed green and the other with a bit of a bluish tint – adding a bit of variety to the palette while remaining in the same chromatic vein.

Disrupt by Oui Will

Disrupt by Oui Will

Oui Will is a company that defines itself as a “digital brand accelerator.” Based out of San Diego, California, Oui Will works with startups and brands, helping them grow with the use of digital and technological innovations. What’s particularly interesting is that the agency provides high value services to budding brands and startups at no initial cost, which helps with the extremely common problem of the lack of initial capital. One of the concepts introduced by Oui Will is the one of “disruptive brands,” which the agency has showcased in Disrupt – an experience website created to show how they build brands by building tech. The experience starts with a dark screen with large dark green typography introducing the concept of “disrupt.” Upon initiating the experience, we are taken to a screen with a background in dark green with a hint of aquamarine, and oversized text slowly moving up. An image of an abstract sculpture made of iron, concrete or a similar heavy-duty material floats in the center. Clicking anywhere on the page takes us to another screen, this time black. Each interaction with the page prompts a change and a step along the project’s storytelling path, with green, black and white switching and playing around each other, here in the background, there in the typography, an image or an interface element. As far as these kinds of “experience websites” go, this is a very skilfully balanced one, with a concept that doesn’t push the boundaries of good UX too far, and design that is precise, smart and extremely well calibrated.

Hotel Peter & Paul

Hotel Peter & Paul

Located in the heart of New Orleans, Hotel Peter & Paul is a group of historic buildings – a schoolhouse, a church, a rectory and a convent – renovated and repurposed into a hotel. Each of the buildings kept some of its original interior and the rest was designed in a way that reflects the historic purpose of the facility. The hotel website promises a unique stay and instills a sense of coziness and warmth, imbued in subtle historic references and delightful details. It opens with an intro section in a pastel greyish green, a soft shade that quickly gives room to a hero section with a full width image, where the green, blue and gray pastels remain as the colors of the window curtain, a lovely transition from the intro to the homepage proper. A warm, light background is next paired with an elegant deep green used for the Feijoa typeface from the Klim foundry (which you may remember from our selection of the best independent type foundries). The design bears a distinct vintage quality thanks precisely to this smart combination of colors and typefaces, and makes a great fit for a hotel set in such a historically interesting environment.

Seed

Seed

Probiotics are the sort of supplement that has been in a lot of focus over the past few years, thanks to extensive research on the importance of a healthy gut microbiome on overall human health. Seed is an American company that took probiotics research and commercial sales to a whole new level, with a team of medical doctors, chemists, immunologists, science advisors, and even artists and poets, working very hard to deliver the perfect daily synbiotic through an extremely well-rounded brand. Seed pays a lot of attention to microbiomes on a wider ecological level too, following the belief that, as they put it, “Health is not just human.”

It appears that the company invested as much attention and care into the design of the website as they did in the product itself. It opens with a hero section in a warm olive green, with a dark green pill in the middle, resting within a soft, sand-like circle. The side menu that opens when the anchors in the header are hovered upon is also green, but this time without any texture. The mossy green is used for the typography on sections with white background, and there is a beautiful illustration of bacteria that expands on scroll. The homepage closes with a quite large footer in green. The inner pages are mostly white, with green text that has a more clean-cut, scientific character.

Thyme

Thyme

Thyme is a country house hotel or, better yet, a village within a village located in the Cotswolds rural area of south-central England. Consisting of a manor and a collection of restored historic buildings and carefully curated gardens, Thyme offers everything from a simple B&B stay, a spa weekend, exquisite dining, culinary and pottery classes, to corporate events and weddings. Just looking at the website with its balanced, elegant layouts and gorgeous imagery makes one want to book a stay there immediately and to stay indefinitely. Green is featured as the main color, used for banners, logo, typography, as well as for the background in a few selected sections. The design is a skillful combination of tradition and innovation, a principle that the brand itself carefully pursues. It’s dipped in the spirit of the traditional English countryside, with much emphasis on the care for nature, and a healthy dose of sophisticated elegance.

Astrolabe Wines

Astrolabe Wines

New Zealand’s incredible natural opulence and its resources make it one of the best regions in the world for winemaking. The Marlborough district, in particular, has long been deemed the nation’s wine country. This particular area is the home to Astrolabe Wines, a family-run winery renowned for its Sauvignon Blanc and Chardonnay. A warm dark green featured throughout the winery website is a hint to the rich land that produces what the family believes are “the best grapes in the world.” The homepage is interestingly sectioned – the left and right parts of the page are static, featuring a bottle of wine on the left and a section with a hidden side menu on the right, and the central part is actually a slider that moves horizontally on scroll. The green in the side area is a warm kelp hue, and a similar color can be found on the bottle label, where it pairs perfectly with a brass tone chosen for the winery logo. The imagery in the slider is all about green, too – soft hills, lush vegetation, vineyards and ponds all bear the same warm, golden green quality that we see on the bottle label and in the green used for the interface, and the light grey background lightens up the design and gives it a breezy feel.

Re-Forme

Re-Forme

Re-Forme is an Australian manufacturer of sustainable, Earth-friendly packaging products. The products are made of 63% clay, use zero water and produce zero waste. They are 100% biodegradable and recyclable, and break down extremely fast in landfill. The line of products includes items that are otherwise made of plastic or paper and are quite un-ecological – paper and plastic cups and straws, lids, bowls, takeaway trays, tapes and such.

The website opens with a lovely hero section in dark green paired with a warm ochre used for the illustration of a hand holding the planet Earth. The beige brings out the yellow component in the green shade, creating a lovely, balanced composition. As we scroll down, the beige assumes the primary role and is now coupled with a dark coral for the illustration and product background, which then, in turn, becomes the background color, combined with the green color that opened the website. The colors continue to switch in a playful and perfectly balanced interplay of pairs, each one reminiscent of an important part of our environment – plants, soil, clay.

Closing Words

Green is a color that communicates a life-giving energy. It is vibrant, energetic and cheerful. Certain bright and intense greens can come off as too nervous or loud, but not the deep greens. These wonderful deep hues instill a sense of calm and focus, which is just one of the reasons they found such wide use in web design. We saw from the gorgeous examples we went through in this list that dark green can be used in literally any niche to instill a variety of meanings – from calm and hope to class and sophistication. Being a wonderfully versatile color, dark green is a worthy companion both for warm and for cold colors, and that’s precisely why so many designers reach for it when looking to balance out a layout. If you are looking for color inspiration for your next project, then the websites we visited today should give you loads of ideas for basing it around dark green.

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